Atlanta Retirement Communities

St. George Village Blog

Tag Archive: seniors

  • Whirligig Wizard

    This fanciful whirligig was created by Harold Tinley, one of our residents. Harold, who is vision impaired, designed the spinning garden ornament and completed it in our woodworking shop with the assistance of our Director of Plant Operations Frank Wooten and his maintenance team.

    The wind-powered whirligig, which is installed on the path near the lake and our gazebo, is a lot of fun for our residents, staff and visitors to watch!

    Thank you for this whimsical decoration, Harold!

    Posted in Independent Living, Lifestyle, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , ,

  • What in the Helicopter?!

    On a recent visit to the Tellus Science Museum in Cartersville, Ga., several St. George Village residents and staff enjoyed exploring the various special exhibits and permanent galleries that are housed in the 120,000 square foot world-class museum.

    Pictured here, SGV driver Dave Fagerstrom and resident Jack Dudley admire a Bell Helicopter. The Bell is the first helicopter that Dave flew during his service in Vietnam as an Air Force helicopter pilot.

    The Bell Helicopter is part of Tellus Museum’s Science in Motion Gallery, which explores the relationship mankind has with powered vehicles designed to increase the speed of travel.

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , ,

  • Honoring Our Veterans

    St. George Village members and staff gathered for a special Veterans Day ceremony on November 11. Rev. Larry Robert of Vitas Hospice led the service, and SGV’s Villagers choral group sang all of the songs representing each branch of the U.S. Military.

     

    Flags were raised by the Roswell High School Color Guard, and Adam Christian honored the custom of playing “Taps” on the trumpet to end the service.

    Afterward, each veteran present at the ceremony was recognized with a flag pin and everyone enjoyed a piece of the sheet cake decorated as a U.S. flag.

    God bless our veterans and America!

    Posted in Independent Living, Lifestyle, Partnerships, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , , ,

  • Skyline Viewing and Sippable Orange Creamsicles

    SGV resident Jack Dudley waves as he waits to board the SkyView Ferris Wheel.

    A group of intrepid St. George Villagers recently ventured south to Centennial Park in Atlanta to take a ride on the SkyView Ferris Wheel.

    Towering nearly 20 stories above the Park, the SkyView Ferris wheel features 42 climate-controlled gondolas that hold up to six people.

    Marie Monteleone, seated in a gondola, awaits take-off.

    Guests are treated to breathtaking panoramic views of downtown Atlanta and the surrounding metropolitan area.

    Afterward, the fearless riders stopped by an Atlanta landmark, The Varsity, for an F.O.! (If you’re not up on Varsity lingo, F.O. is the restaurant’s iconic frosted orange drink.)

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Lifestyle, Residents Corner | Tagged , , ,

  • Protecting Yourself And Your Nest Egg

    If you think you or a loved one has been the target of elder fraud, contact the Department of Consumer Protection to report the abuse.

    While seniors are often targeted by scammers, there are ways you can protect yourself and those you care about.

    New fraud schemes emerge constantly and the scammers are relentlessly creative. Seniors may get official-sounding e-mails seeking a fee for a bogus service or collecting an “inheritance.” Homeowners are targeted with phony service calls. In one brazen scam, a criminal posing as a grandchild asks the senior to wire money to get the grandchild out of a jam.

    In some cases, caregivers and family members may try to take advantage of a senior’s depen­dence and ask the senior to sign papers that shift control to the caregiver, or simply forge the senior’s ­signature.

    Fortunately, seniors can understand the risks and protect themselves. Here are a few helpful tips.

    • Beware of “robocalls”; that is, a computerized message, instead of a person on the phone.

    • If anyone calls or e-mails you offering an opportunity to collect a prize by paying an up-front fee, remember: If it sounds too good to be true, it is.

    • Keep your Social Security number, credit card numbers, account PINs and other personal information to yourself. Your bank and other companies you do business with won’t call you to ask you to “confirm” this information.

    • Don’t be pressured. If you feel pressured to make a decision or purchase, or if you are unsure to whom you are talking, just say “no” and hang up.

    • Open your door only if you recognize the person there.

    • Never sign any document you don’t fully understand. If in doubt, ask a trusted friend, family member or adviser. Never sign blank checks or forms.

    • Keep a close eye on bank statements, credit card bills and invoices to spot any suspicious activity that could indicate identity theft. Requesting a free copy of your credit report annually (at www.annualcreditreport.com) is a good way to spot potential problems.

    • Shred your old bills and paperwork to make sure your personal information can’t be ac­cessed by “dumpster diving” thieves. Make sure your mailbox is secure.

    • For home repair projects, always get a second estimate and call the companies’ references. Never pay for the work in advance—unscrupulous contractors may take the money and run.

    • Never use an untraceable wire service to transfer money. If you have to wire money, manage the transfer with your bank and make sure it can trace the recipient.

    Remain vigilant. If you think you or a loved one has been the target of elder fraud, contact the state’s Department of Consumer Protection to report the abuse. For more information, visit the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse.

     

    Posted in Knowledge Center, News | Tagged , , , ,

  • New Website Makes Futures Markets Simple

    A new online resource is available to help explain how movement in financial markets can impact everyday life.

    Recent headlines have described a series of dramatic movements in the financial markets. While many of those movements impact stock prices, as well as what we pay for groceries, gas or loan rates, not everyone really understands how it all works.

    Now there is a new online resource available to help explain what those markets mean to everyday life. With easy-to-understand content that everyone from high school students to financial professors will find ­useful, Futures Fundamentals (www.futuresfundamentals.com) makes understanding markets simple.

    The site takes investing concepts like futures, hedging and speculating and shows how they play an essential role in the world around us.

    For example, if you purchased your home with the intent of selling it when the market value exceeded the original price, you likely didn’t think you were speculating. Yet that’s exactly what you were doing. You probably think of having car insurance as common sense, but you’re hedging against risk, just like thousands of companies need to do every day.

    Futures Fundamentals provides a unique educational experience by linking topics in the news to simple explanations, a glossary of terms, and quizzes to sharpen your knowledge. CME Group—one of the world’s leading derivatives exchanges—created Futures Fundamentals with the goal of making financial education an engaging experience for anyone, regardless of how well versed they are in the world of finance.

    “One of the things we’ve seen over the past few years is a real hunger for information about how people and businesses manage risk, and how that risk impacts people’s everyday lives,” said Anita Liskey, CME Group Managing Director, Corporate Marketing & Communications. “Our goal for this site is to be a go-to resource on futures and derivatives, whether you’re a novice on Main Street or an expert on Wall Street.”

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, News | Tagged , , ,

  • Felines Take the Stage at SGV

    Blessed Trinity High School "Cats"Students from neighboring Blessed Trinity High School recently performed excerpts from their stage production of Cats, the Musical for the St. George Village community. The talented performers wore their full costumes and treated the audience to an afternoon of fabulous song and dance.

    St. George Village and Blessed Trinity often partner together for community service and friendship! The school has provided passes to SGV residents to all Blessed Trinity events, including football games, concerts, plays and more.

    Thank you, Blessed Trinity!

    Posted in News, Partnerships | Tagged , ,

  • Heeding the Signs

    SGV members Alice and Jim Sterling had the foresight to plan for their future health and lifestyle needs.

    When Jim Sterling was present for the groundbreaking of St. George Village back in 2003, he and his wife, Alice, were interested in the community… but not yet ready to leave their home in a nearby subdivision. They visited again in 2005 when the life care community opened for residency… and Jim still wasn’t ready to leave home. But two years later, the Sterlings knew it was finally the right time to make St. George Village their permanent home.

    “Even though we were both still active and able to drive at the time, the signs were there. Little things started happening,” recalls Alice. “We were eventually going to need some help.”

    The Sterlings first moved into a two-bedroom apartment, and later downsized to a one-bedroom apartment when they realized they needed even less space. Then, when they both needed the help that Alice had foreseen, the couple moved into The Springs, the assisted living community within St. George Village.

    The Sterlings are still able to enjoy all of the amenities that were available to them in independent living, but they now receive welcome assistance with day-to-day tasks.

    “We enjoy three meals a day in the dining room, and all of the cleaning and any shopping we need is done for us now,” says Alice, who has experienced issues with her shoulder. “Our laundry is also done for us — three times a week! I have assistance with showering and we have help for any other health needs we might experience.”

    Although Alice and Jim no longer drive, they don’t worry about transportation. They simply take advantage of SGV’s bus service, which ferries them to doctors’ appointments, the bank, grocery store, pharmacy and local department stores. Alice plays bridge a couple of times a week and reads voraciously. And Jim, although he doesn’t get out on the golf course as he did in the past, is still a sport — he loves watching baseball and football. They both enjoy the beautiful grounds outdoors at SGV.

    “We originally came to St. George Village for all the amenities you can enjoy while still living independently. But we knew when we needed help, the facilities and staff would be there for us,” says Alice. “We really don’t lack for anything, now that we’ve moved into assisted living. I’m glad we’re here!

    Posted in Independent Living, Lifestyle, Residents Corner, Wellness | Tagged , , , , , , ,

  • How Strong Is Your Chi? Learning Tai Chi And Qigong to Prevent Slips, Trips And Falls

    Tai chi is just one of many health and wellness activities offered to St. George Village members.

    Many older adults have found benefit from the centuries-old Chinese martial arts tai chi and qigong. “Chi” or “qi” (chee) means “life energy.” “Qigong” (chee-goong) literally means “life energy cultivation.” Tai chi consists of a series of flowing movements while qigong focuses on the repetition of isolated movements and breathing.

    For example, Robert Johnson, M.D., Kaiser Permanente Chief of Palliative Care in Walnut Creek, Calif., has practiced tai chi and qigong since the 1970s. He believes these mind-body exercises promote good health, flexibility, strength and balance, which help reduce the risk of falling among seniors.

    Each year, one out of three adults, age 65 and older, falls due to lack of balance or other reasons. Consider that a record 11,000 baby boomers turn 65 and become Medicare eligible every day, and that can add up to a lot of falls and serious injuries.

    “We spend most of our day in sedentary jobs. Many of us sit in front of a computer or television for hours at a time,” Dr. Johnson said. “To age well, we need to move, stretch and keep our joints lubricated and flexible. Otherwise, our muscles, joints and tendons become stiff and brittle, and that can lead to falls and disabilities.”

    Dr. Johnson recommends moving the joints in a circular motion. For example, place the hands on the knees and rotate the knees together in a clockwise and then counterclockwise motion. Also, try sitting in a squat position and stand up slowly to strengthen the quadriceps.

    By clicking here, you can view a short video in which Dr. Johnson demonstrates a few basic exercises and explains why they’re helpful.

    Along with doing exercises that promote flexibility, seniors can also help prevent falls and serious injuries by taking a few simple precautions at home:

    • Reduce tripping hazards such as throw rugs, raised doorway thresholds, or loose carpet.

    • Keep paths clear of electrical cords and clutter.

    • Add grab bars where necessary—in hallways, stairways and bathtubs.

    • Add a rubber bath mat in the shower or tub.

    • Improve lighting throughout the house and use night-lights in hallways and bathrooms.

    • Keep a phone and flashlight by the bed.

     

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Wellness | Tagged , , ,

  • Regular Eye Exams are Important for Seniors

    Many seniors will be glad to learn that there are steps they can take to protect against vision problems—starting with an eye exam. A regular exam is important because some eye conditions and diseases do not show warning signs.

    While it is commonly known that eye troubles increase rapidly with age—particularly after age 65—a lesser-known fact is that vision loss is also associated with a higher incidence of falls, injuries, depression and social isolation.

    As part of an overall health-maintenance strategy, the American Academy of Ophthalmology urges seniors to have a comprehensive eye exam, especially if they have not had one in the past two years, whether or not there are symptoms.

    The Academy also encourages seniors, their loved ones and caregivers to be aware of signs that indicate vision problems that require an eye exam. These problems can include:

    • Bumping into or knocking over objects

    • Stepping hesitantly

    • Squinting or tilting the head when trying to focus

    • Missing objects when reaching

    • Discontinuing everyday activities such as reading and writing.

    Simple, painless eye exams are crucial in detecting an eye disease or condition in its early stages, to help preserve your sight. During the exam, an ophthalmologist—a medical doctor who specializes in eye care—will provide a diagnosis and treatment of all eye diseases and conditions.

    Despite medical evidence that healthy vision plays a critical role in overall health and happiness, many older adults in the United States do not seek regular eye care or face difficulty accessing and paying for health care services.

    To ensure that all seniors throughout the country have access to eye care services, nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists are available to provide eye care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors 65 and older through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which matches patients to volunteer ophthalmologists.

    “Sight problems should not be ignored at any age, but particularly in seniors, as problems are more common in this group of patients,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., MPH, chairman for EyeCare America. “The earlier a patient seeks medical diagnosis and treatment, the greater the chances for saving and recovering one’s vision, which contributes to overall health and happiness.”

    The program is sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation with additional support from Alcon. To learn more and to see if you qualify, visit EyeCare America.

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Wellness | Tagged , , ,