Atlanta Retirement Communities

St. George Village Blog

Tag Archive: continuing care retirement community

  • Get in the Game — Have Fun in Retirement!

    Who needs an actual football game to enjoy a tailgate party? It was all rah-rah-rah, sis-boom-bah at St. George Village when residents and visitors wearing their game-day best arrived at our October Tailgate & Celebrate event!

    Tailgate & Celebrate was an afternoon to be remembered, with all of the ambience and fanfare of a college football game day experience. The event kicked off with a welcome by the Blessed Trinity High School Marching Band drum line at our front entrance, and classic cars lining the driveway, beckoning to be explored.

    Throughout our grounds, guests joined in games of corn hole and football toss, grooved to the sounds of the 1950s and 60s spun by a DJ, and crammed into a photo booth for fun group snapshots. Our fabulous dining services staff prepared and served up a variety of delicious tailgate-style foods under college-themed tents, where fans of a feather gathered for more photo opportunities. And throughout the community, residents proudly displayed their college memorabilia, adding to the festive fall atmosphere.

    At St. George Village, we understand the importance of having fun and why it is an integral part of a happy, healthy and successful retirement. According to the Harvard Study of Adult Development, one of the oldest and most respected studies on aging in the country, exercising, making new friends, continuing to learn and having fun are the closest things to finding the fountain of youth. In fact, planning for how you’re going to incorporate these elements into your retirement lifestyle is crucial to how successful you will be.

    Fun events like Tailgate & Celebrate are a regular part of our full slate of activities that include planned excursions to places local and farther away, intellectually challenging discussions and technology workshops, fitness opportunities, gaming, concerts and more! Every day, we offer opportunities for our residents to learn new things, make new friends and live life to the fullest.

    Come see all of the ways you can experience a fun-filled retirement lifestyle at St. George Village. Take a tour, stay for lunch. Call Stacy at 678-987-0402 for a confidential appointment.

    Find more details about our community, lifestyle and residents at www.stgeorgevillage.org. Follow us on Facebook and Pinterest, too!

    Posted in Independent Living, Lifestyle, News | Tagged , , , ,

  • Touring Georgia’s Governor’s Mansion

    Jean Hart, Nancy Allvine and Rose Brual prepare to enter the Governor's Mansion for a holiday tour.

    Several of our residents experienced a special treat recently when they toured the Georgia Governor’s Mansion in Buckhead. First Lady Sandra Deal was waiting at the front door to greet visitors as they embarked on a tour of the residence, which was festively decorated for the holiday season.

    Georgia's First Lady Sandra Deal (right) welcomes Nell Caprara on the front steps of the Governor's Mansion.

     

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Lifestyle, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , , , ,

  • Season’s Greetings!

    We love Christmastime here at St. George Village and our festive lobby shows it! From the nativity scene to our two-story tree, we are celebrating the joy of each and every day of this holiday season.

    We wish all of you a blessed, peaceful and joyful Christmas!

    Posted in Faith, Independent Living | Tagged , , , , , ,

  • Doing Something Grand!

    It was a day of intergenerational fun on Saturday, September 12, when St. George Village celebrated National Grandparents Day with residents, their families and staff!

    SGV’s own “Knitting Master” Dot Heuslein hosted a table of her hand-made items for sale, and donated the proceeds to the Alzheimer’s Association.

    The grandkids (and some older kids) had a lot of fun making crazy balloon hats and animals, and enjoyed face painting, refreshments and entertainment by Judy Boehm and the Class Act Band.

    A Grand Day was had by all!

    Posted in Independent Living, Lifestyle, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , , , ,

  • Meet the Staff: Quamaine Edwards

    Quamaine Edwards

    Service technician Quamaine Edwards has a ready smile and positive outlook that just won’t quit!

    Quamaine Edwards, affectionately known as “Q,” is the oldest of several children… and that’s a position that helped to instill in him a strong work ethic and the importance of setting a good example.

    “When you’re the oldest of five children and also the oldest grandchild, you’re put in a leadership position,” he says. “So, you have to set a good example.”

    Quamaine sets a good example every day in his job as a service technician in SGV’s maintenance department. He truly looks forward to coming to work.

    “I like putting a smile on the residents’ faces here. They’re like grandparents to me,” he explains. “I enjoy taking care of their needs and making sure they’re okay.”

    An all-around athlete, Quamaine played football and basketball and ran track in high school, and later attended South Carolina State University on a football scholarship. Today, he uses those skills to coach 8-and-under boys basketball for the Marietta Parks & Recreation Department.

    The father of a seven-month-old, Q says he hopes his son has inherited his athletic ability.
    “Just to make sure, I’m going to get him started early!” he laughs.

    Quamaine was recently named St. George Village’s Care Partner of the Quarter.

    Posted in Independent Living, Lifestyle, Residents Corner | Tagged , , ,

  • Meet the Staff: Catherine Kimani

    Catherine Kimani’s love of life and her work as a care partner at St. George Village show in her smile!

    Catherine Kimani says her favorite part of working at St. George Village is the friendly and cooperative spirit that pervades every aspect of the community.

    “It’s an awesome place to work. Really, it is!” she says. “Everyone is so friendly and I love working with all the care partners as a team. This is a wonderful, stress-free place to work.”

    Catherine, a Certified Nursing Assistant (C.N.A.), works in the Treasures of Lakeview community. She came to the United States six years ago from her native Kenya, where she also worked as a C.N.A.

    “I love working with seniors, so when I moved here, I just continued on with my career,” she explains. “All I had to do was get licensed.”

    Catherine lives in Acworth with her family. When she’s not working, she enjoys singing in church, shopping, cooking and, believe it or not, cleaning!

    Catherine was recently named St. George Village’s Care Partner of the Quarter.

    Posted in Lifestyle, Partnerships | Tagged , , , , ,

  • Promoting Improved Quality of Life for Older Georgians

    One of the highlights of the Summit was celebrating a declaration from Gov. Nathan Deal, designating September 26, 2013 as "Culture Change Day in Georgia."

    Fifteen St. George Village care partners and two of the community’s residents attended the 6th Annual Culture Change Summit on Sept. 26. The purpose of the Summit is to bring together interested parties for a discussion of how to effectively change the way people think about seniors and the aging process.

    Keynote speaker and a “Regulator turned Educator” Carmen Bowman spoke to conference attendees about her experience as a nursing home surveyor and discussed how to make senior care communities feel less institutional and more like home for residents.

    St. George Village was well represented, with care partners from Culinary, Dietary, Skilled Nursing (Treasures of Lakeview), Personal Care (The Springs), and Independent Living attending. SGV Social Worker Meredith Swinford participated in a Speakers Panel, where she shared the progress St. George Village has made on its Person-Centered Care journey.

    One of the highlights of the day was celebrating a declaration from Gov. Nathan Deal, designating September 26, 2013 as “Culture Change Day in Georgia.”

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, News, Partnerships, Wellness | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

  • Important Medication Tips For Seniors

    Should you be taking the medications you’re taking? If you’re 65 or older, that’s an important question to ask yourself and your healthcare provider. Why? Because some commonly prescribed medications can actually be harmful for older adults.

    As you get older, your body changes. These changes can in­crease the chances that you might have side effects from certain drugs. For example, your liver or kidneys may not function quite as well as when you were younger, so your body can’t pro­cess medications in the same way. This can lead to a build-up of the drug in your system, which can increase the risk of side effects such as falls, a drop in blood pressure or heart rate, drowsiness, or confusion.

    Many older adults have two or more health problems that require multiple medications and treatments. Because of this, older adults are more likely to experience potentially harmful interactions between their prescriptions. In fact, every year, one in three adults 65 and older has one or more harmful reactions to medications they are taking.

    “Older adults and their caregivers need to take an active role in managing their medications,” says Cathy Alessi, M.D., a physician who specializes in the care of older adults and is the president of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS). “They need to ask questions of their doctor, nurse, physician assistant, or pharmacist, and read the information that comes with their medications. All medications have side effects, even those sold over-the-counter. That’s why patients should discuss the risks and benefits of any medication with their healthcare pro­vider before deciding which ones are right for them.”

    What should you do to lower your odds of having harmful medication side effects or drug interactions? Here are five tips from the American Geriatrics Society:

    1. Bring a list of all the medications, vitamins, herbal supplements, and over-the-counter drugs you’re taking to every medical appointment. The list should include the dosages you take and how often you take them. Be sure your emergency contact person or caregiver has an up-to-date copy of the list.

    2. If you notice a new health problem or symptom after starting a new medication, you may be having a harmful drug reaction. Tell your healthcare provider right away. If you have a serious reaction, such as difficulty breathing or swelling in your throat, call 911 and go to the emergency room immediately.

    3. Fill your prescriptions at the same pharmacy and get to know your local pharmacist. Your pharmacist’s job is to be aware of all the medications you’re taking. Most pharmacies use computer systems that alert the pharmacist to possible drug interactions.

    4. Once or twice a year, ask your primary healthcare provider to review your list of medications, supplements, and vitamins. Ask whether you still need to take each one, and at its current dose. There may be times when your provider will decide to stop some of your medications or adjust the doses. Just remember, though, that you should never change the dose or stop taking any medication without first consulting your provider.

    5. Whenever a healthcare professional prescribes a new medication, changes a dosage, or stops prescribing a drug you’ve been prescribed, ask for an explanation. It’s important that you understand these changes in your care.

    To help healthcare providers care for older adults who take multiple medications, the AGS has published a list of medications that may cause harmful side effects in older people when taken alone or in combination. In the healthcare industry this list is known as the “Beers List,” or “Beers Criteria,” and is named after the late Dr. Mark Beers, a geriatric medicine specialist who originated the list in 1991.

    For more information about how to safely manage your medications, visit www.healthinaging.org, the website of the AGS Foundation for Health in Aging.

    Questions to Ask Your Healthcare Provider About Your Medications:

    • Why are you prescribing this particular medication?

    • Are there other medications that might be safer or more ­effective?

    • What are the potential side effects? Which ones are serious enough to call you or 911?

    • How will I know if the medication is working?

    • Does this medication interact with any other drugs I’m taking?

    • Are there any dietary restrictions I should follow?

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Wellness | Tagged , , , , , ,

  • Three Ways to Stay in Shape as You Get Older

    Gary Player, the most successful international golfer of all time, is an avid supporter of physical fitness for all ages.

    by Gary Player

    As a professional golfer, it has always been important to me to stay in shape—and you can do so, too. As a matter of fact, my commitment to health and fitness has been a big part of my success in golf, winning tournaments over the course of five decades. However, as I get older, I realize that it takes a little bit more stretching, a little more training and a little more recovery time to keep in shape.

    Most older people face such struggles, no matter how athletic they have been throughout their lives.

    Staying fit is extremely important at any age, and not just for athletes. It can lead to improved sleep, weight control, concentration and mood.

    It’s important for you to keep active as you get older to help stave off high blood pressure and cholesterol, heart disease, stroke and diabetes, as well as other medical conditions that se­niors often face, such as osteoporosis and depression.

    Keeping in shape can also reduce the likelihood of falls and help you remain independent for years to come. For instance, regular jogging increases men’s life expectancy by 6.2 years and women’s by 5.6 years, the Copenhagen City Heart Study found.

    Fortunately, you can get in shape at just about any age. Consider the more than 10,000 adults over the age of 50 who participate every two years at the National Senior Games presented by Hu­mana. They’re an excellent example of people who not only recognize the importance of fitness but excel at multiple athletic activities.

    Three Tips

    You don’t need to be a super-athlete to stay in shape, but it’s important to get out there and do something. Here are three tips to help you keep fit:

    Fitness Classes. Many health plans offer fitness classes—such as SilverSneakers through Hu­mana Medicare Advantage—or yoga to give older individuals a fun, easy way to stay in shape. Staying fit in a group setting can be motivating and help you stay social.

    Health Screenings & An­nual Physicals. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, all Medicare members now have access to one free annual wellness visit. Many preventive screenings, including type 2 diabetes and various cancers, are now also covered. Meeting with your primary care physician will give you more detailed, personalized information on what you can do to get and stay in shape.

    Exercise Like a Kid. Just because you’re older doesn’t mean you can’t exercise like a kid. After all, a recent American Cancer Society survey found that women are more likely to be physically active if it feels more like play and less like work. Simply jump on a bike or play an interactive video game, such as Wii bowling or—my favorite—Wii golf. You can also find multigenerational playgrounds across the country to help stay in shape.

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Wellness | Tagged , , , , , ,

  • Physical Therapy for a Better Quality Of Life

    Physical therapy can play a key role in any wellness program, helping people avoid future health problems.

    The next time you have a pain in the neck or back, your arthritis is acting up, you are recovering from surgery or any of the countless other conditions affecting your ability to move freely within your daily life, a physical therapist can probably help. Physical therapists can even help fight complications from diabetes, such as loss of movement.

    And, physical therapy is a covered benefit under Medicare and most commercial insurance plans.

    Physical therapists are highly trained clinicians and more than 75 percent have a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree. The discipline can trace its roots back to Hippocrates, father of Western medicine, who advocated “hands on” treatment, including massage, manual therapy and hydrotherapy for the ancient Greeks.

    “Most people only think about physical therapy for help with orthopedic issues, such as a bad knee or shoulder, or in relation to sports injuries, but physical therapy is much more than that—it is a key component in the treatment of the full range of neuromusculoskeletal diseases and conditions,” said Matthew R. Hyland, PT, Ph.D. and president of the New York Physical Therapy Association. “Physical therapy can help people walk after suffering a stroke, help people with rheumatoid arthritis complete everyday tasks such as cooking or writing, and help people regain their stamina after a heart attack.”

    Physical therapy is a cornerstone in the treatment of many musculoskeletal and neurological conditions, from arthritis to vertigo and from sprains, strains and fractures to stroke. It uses a variety of therapeutic techniques including manual therapy, exercise, balance training and patient education to relax, strengthen and heal muscles.
    Its primary goal is to help maintain, restore or improve motion and mobility that has been impaired by disability, injury or disease. It can also help eliminate pain in tendinitis, bursitis, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, offering an alternative to costly medications and injections. Plus, by eliminating pain and restoring mobility, it can often help avoid the need for surgery.

    To find out more about physical therapy and how it can help you, go to www.moveforwardny.com.

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Wellness | Tagged , , ,