Atlanta Retirement Communities

St. George Village Blog

  • Squirrel-Proof Your Birdfeeder

    Squirrels. They’re tenacious, ingenious creatures, especially when it comes to figuring out how to rob your birdfeeder of its seeds. At St. George Village, we have our share of these fluffy-tailed gymnasts, but we love feeding our feathered friends and want them to have their share of seeds, especially in the wintertime.

    If your heart takes wing at the sight of birds in your yard, consider these seven suggestions for saving the seeds you leave them from squirrels:

    1. Location: Mount birdfeeders on a smooth metal pole at least six feet high. Prune any branches within a 12-foot radius.

    2. Baffles: Install baffles, at least 15 inches wide and sloped, between the top of the feeder and its hanger or between the ground and the feeder.

    3. Spinners: String spinners on a horizontal line.

    4. Seed: Squirrels are less attracted to nyger, millet, safflower, canary and canola seeds.

    5. Clean: Remove any debris and spilled seed from around the feeder.

    6. Traps: Live traps can harmlessly catch and relocate squirrels.

    7. Squirrel-Proof Feeders: There are several kinds. Squirrel-resistant feeders have doors that close when triggered by the squirrel’s weight. Metal feeders help minimize the damage from hungry squirrels. Wire cages around a birdfeeder can keep squirrels out but may prevent large birds from accessing the feeder as well.

    You can also get a humane and effective interactive birdfeeder, such as the Squirrel Boss Bird Feeder. This type of feeder has a remote control operated by you from inside your house. When you press it, the offending squirrel gets a harmless static shock that tingles but doesn’t hurt.

    Or visit Walter Reeves, the Georgia Gardener, online. You’ll find his tips and a lot of helpful gardening, lawn and landscaping advice on his site, The Georgia Gardener.

    Posted in Knowledge Center |

  • Have More Get-Up-And-Go As Time Goes By

    For optimal health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that older adults get a minimum of two hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or one hour and 15 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity every week. In addition, muscle-strengthening activities should be conducted two or more days a week.

    Exercise can help prevent many physical problems and chronic conditions that come with aging, including weight gain, back pain and heart disease. Plus, it keeps the mind sharp and can help you feel happier, improving symptoms of depression and even dementia. To gain these benefits, however, you need to find a fitness program that provides the physical results desired and is enjoyable, too, so you’ll stick to it.

    Before you begin any exercise program, McMahon has the following tips:

    1. See your doctor, especially if you have a chronic condition.

    2. Start slowly. Begin by walking, say, for 10 minutes or so a day. As you gain energy and your body builds stamina, increase your activity levels and make it more challenging.

    3. Stay motivated. Have realistic short-term goals you can easily meet.

    4. Don’t be intimidated. Remember that everyone had to walk in the door for the first time. Don’t let the thought of starting hold you back. You can do it.

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, News, Wellness |

  • It’s Never Too Late to Learn New Things!

    In technology seminars offered regularly at St. George Village, participants learn how to make the most of their iPads and smartphones by using applications for emailing, making photos and videos, listening to music, using social media sites such as Facebook, and more. These classes take away the fear and put the fun into using current technology devices!

    Recent iPad workshop graduates, pictured here with Jane Ratliff and a volunteer from BlueHair Technology Group (back row), proudly display their Certificates of Completion.

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Partnerships | Tagged , , , , , ,

  • How Strong Is Your Chi? Learning Tai Chi And Qigong to Prevent Slips, Trips And Falls

    Tai chi is just one of many health and wellness activities offered to St. George Village members.

    Many older adults have found benefit from the centuries-old Chinese martial arts tai chi and qigong. “Chi” or “qi” (chee) means “life energy.” “Qigong” (chee-goong) literally means “life energy cultivation.” Tai chi consists of a series of flowing movements while qigong focuses on the repetition of isolated movements and breathing.

    For example, Robert Johnson, M.D., Kaiser Permanente Chief of Palliative Care in Walnut Creek, Calif., has practiced tai chi and qigong since the 1970s. He believes these mind-body exercises promote good health, flexibility, strength and balance, which help reduce the risk of falling among seniors.

    Each year, one out of three adults, age 65 and older, falls due to lack of balance or other reasons. Consider that a record 11,000 baby boomers turn 65 and become Medicare eligible every day, and that can add up to a lot of falls and serious injuries.

    “We spend most of our day in sedentary jobs. Many of us sit in front of a computer or television for hours at a time,” Dr. Johnson said. “To age well, we need to move, stretch and keep our joints lubricated and flexible. Otherwise, our muscles, joints and tendons become stiff and brittle, and that can lead to falls and disabilities.”

    Dr. Johnson recommends moving the joints in a circular motion. For example, place the hands on the knees and rotate the knees together in a clockwise and then counterclockwise motion. Also, try sitting in a squat position and stand up slowly to strengthen the quadriceps.

    By clicking here, you can view a short video in which Dr. Johnson demonstrates a few basic exercises and explains why they’re helpful.

    Along with doing exercises that promote flexibility, seniors can also help prevent falls and serious injuries by taking a few simple precautions at home:

    • Reduce tripping hazards such as throw rugs, raised doorway thresholds, or loose carpet.

    • Keep paths clear of electrical cords and clutter.

    • Add grab bars where necessary—in hallways, stairways and bathtubs.

    • Add a rubber bath mat in the shower or tub.

    • Improve lighting throughout the house and use night-lights in hallways and bathrooms.

    • Keep a phone and flashlight by the bed.

     

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Wellness | Tagged , , ,

  • Sharing Warmth and Smiles

    Pictured here are Rev. Edward O' Conner, a retired priest living at St. George Village, with a group of children from Queen of Angels Catholic School at the blessing of the Linus blankets.

    Recently, children from Queen of Angels Catholic School visited St. George Village to help make blankets for the Linus Project, a national nonprofit organization that provides homemade blankets to children in need.

    The children, 56 in all, came in groups on November 5, 6, 12 and 13. A dozen SGV residents, along with several of the mothers of the children, made a total of 68 blankets. After making the blankets, the children took them to the chapel at SGV, where a priest blessed both children and blankets. Then, everyone enjoyed a reception with refreshments.

    The blankets will be distributed to various charities, including the Ronald McDonald House, North Fulton Community Charities, and several community shelters for women and children. This is the seventh year that St. George Village and Queen of Angels have participated together in the Linus Project.

    Posted in Faith, Lifestyle, Partnerships | Tagged , , , , ,

  • Regular Eye Exams are Important for Seniors

    Many seniors will be glad to learn that there are steps they can take to protect against vision problems—starting with an eye exam. A regular exam is important because some eye conditions and diseases do not show warning signs.

    While it is commonly known that eye troubles increase rapidly with age—particularly after age 65—a lesser-known fact is that vision loss is also associated with a higher incidence of falls, injuries, depression and social isolation.

    As part of an overall health-maintenance strategy, the American Academy of Ophthalmology urges seniors to have a comprehensive eye exam, especially if they have not had one in the past two years, whether or not there are symptoms.

    The Academy also encourages seniors, their loved ones and caregivers to be aware of signs that indicate vision problems that require an eye exam. These problems can include:

    • Bumping into or knocking over objects

    • Stepping hesitantly

    • Squinting or tilting the head when trying to focus

    • Missing objects when reaching

    • Discontinuing everyday activities such as reading and writing.

    Simple, painless eye exams are crucial in detecting an eye disease or condition in its early stages, to help preserve your sight. During the exam, an ophthalmologist—a medical doctor who specializes in eye care—will provide a diagnosis and treatment of all eye diseases and conditions.

    Despite medical evidence that healthy vision plays a critical role in overall health and happiness, many older adults in the United States do not seek regular eye care or face difficulty accessing and paying for health care services.

    To ensure that all seniors throughout the country have access to eye care services, nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists are available to provide eye care at no out-of-pocket cost to qualifying seniors 65 and older through EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, which matches patients to volunteer ophthalmologists.

    “Sight problems should not be ignored at any age, but particularly in seniors, as problems are more common in this group of patients,” said Richard P. Mills, M.D., MPH, chairman for EyeCare America. “The earlier a patient seeks medical diagnosis and treatment, the greater the chances for saving and recovering one’s vision, which contributes to overall health and happiness.”

    The program is sponsored by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation with additional support from Alcon. To learn more and to see if you qualify, visit EyeCare America.

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Wellness | Tagged , , ,

  • Meet the Staff: Catherine Kimani

    Catherine Kimani’s love of life and her work as a care partner at St. George Village show in her smile!

    Catherine Kimani says her favorite part of working at St. George Village is the friendly and cooperative spirit that pervades every aspect of the community.

    “It’s an awesome place to work. Really, it is!” she says. “Everyone is so friendly and I love working with all the care partners as a team. This is a wonderful, stress-free place to work.”

    Catherine, a Certified Nursing Assistant (C.N.A.), works in the Treasures of Lakeview community. She came to the United States six years ago from her native Kenya, where she also worked as a C.N.A.

    “I love working with seniors, so when I moved here, I just continued on with my career,” she explains. “All I had to do was get licensed.”

    Catherine lives in Acworth with her family. When she’s not working, she enjoys singing in church, shopping, cooking and, believe it or not, cleaning!

    Catherine was recently named St. George Village’s Care Partner of the Quarter.

    Posted in Lifestyle, Partnerships | Tagged , , , , ,

  • The Season of Giving Thanks

    Full Circle

    The year has turned its circle,
    The seasons come and go.
    The harvest all is gathered in
    And chilly north winds blow.
    Orchards have shared their treasures,
    The fields, their yellow grain,
    So open wide the doorway
    Thanksgiving comes again!
    —Author unknown

    We at St. George Village wish everyone the blessings of health and happiness this Thanksgiving!

     

    Posted in News |

  • Technology Classes Keep Seniors Engaged and Connected

    BlueHair Technology Group is on a mission! Their goal is to educate seniors about current technology and how to connect and communicate with family and friends through email, games, video chat, Facebook, etc., on devices like iPads and smartphones.

    St. George Village is pleased to offer a variety of classes taught by BlueHair Technology founder Jane Ratliff and her staff as a service to its residents and members of the community.

    Meet Jane and learn more about BlueHair Technology in this video presentation.

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

  • Understanding Medicare

    People on Medicare can change plans or enroll in one for the first time by December 7 — or they’ll have to wait until next year.

    During Medicare’s annual open enrollment period, which ends December 7, millions of Medicare beneficiaries must decide on their Medicare Advantage (MA) health plan for the coming year. While many factors go into deciding about a plan—cost, choice of doctors, benefits—there’s one important question Medicare beneficiaries should ask: What is the quality rating of the plans I’m considering?

    A high rating means better health care and the best value for your money. Medicare uses a system called Star Ratings. Plans receive a rating of up to five stars. These ratings are based on things like how well the plan does at keeping people healthy by making sure they get the treatments, tests and vaccines they need to prevent illness, how quickly you can get an appointment and see specialists, and how the plan responds to your complaints and concerns.

    For 2014, over a third of MA plans will receive four or more stars, which is an increase from 28 percent in 2013. Seven of the 11 MA plans earning five stars this year are members of the Alliance of Community Health Plans, an organization representing the nation’s leading health plans.

    You can learn more about MA plans—and their quality ratings—using the Medicare Plan Finder. MA plans are called “Medicare Health Plans” in the Plan Finder.

    The National Committee for Quality Assurance also evaluates quality in MA plans; those rankings can be found at www.ncqa.org.

    — Patricia Smith, president and CEO, Alliance of Community Health Plans.

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, News, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , , , , ,