Atlanta Retirement Communities

St. George Village Blog

Category Archive: News

  • Good Dental Care is an Important Part of a Healthier Life for Seniors

    Older adult patients may sometimes lack the motor skills and sharp memory needed to properly care for their oral hygiene.

    While it’s often overlooked, good dental health plays an important role in keeping older adults healthy. Poor oral health care can lead to the deterioration of teeth and gums, infections in the mouth that turn into more serious illnesses such as pneumonia, and cardiovascular disease.

    And missing teeth is no excuse to skip dental visits—experts say visiting the dentist is not just for teeth cleaning, but is also an opportunity for dentists to screen for oral cancer, check denture fittings and help with many critical issues.

    Dental care tips offered by the American Dental Association are essentially the same across all age groups. Adults are encouraged to:

    • Brush their teeth and gums at least twice a day with a fluoride-containing toothpaste

    • Floss at least once a day; preferably twice a day to remove food particles in tough-to-reach places

    • Visit their dentist every six months for a routine cleaning and oral exam

    • Use an antibacterial mouth rinse to reduce bacteria buildup.

    According to leading dentists, however, there are issues specific to treating the elderly that should be addressed and closely monitored.

    Dr. Scott Dickinson, Aspen Dental practice owner from Pace, Fla., has treated many elderly patients and notes that the aging process can make oral care more challenging, particularly as older adults lose some dexterity.

    Dr. Dickinson offers these tips to avoid a decline in wellness due to poor oral health care:

    • Certain prescriptions can affect the healing process of dental procedures. Older adults who are prescribed medicine to keep their bones strong might run the risk of a slower healing process after an extraction or cavity procedure. As a preventative measure, dentists need to consult with the patient’s doctor about their medicines and check that it’s safe to go ahead with dental work.

    • A dry mouth can increase cavities. Some medications cause dry mouth, which is often seen among elderly patients. If the mouth doesn’t produce enough saliva, plaque and food do not get naturally washed away, leading to a higher incidence of cavities.

    • Ill-fitting dentures can lead to poor nutrition. Dr. Dickinson often sees patients who haven’t maintained their dentures, leading to a painful chewing experience. A quick denture fitting can alleviate the pain and ensure that the patient can enjoy his or her meals—and once again get proper nutrition.

     

    Posted in News |

  • New Website Makes Futures Markets Simple

    A new online resource is available to help explain how movement in financial markets can impact everyday life.

    Recent headlines have described a series of dramatic movements in the financial markets. While many of those movements impact stock prices, as well as what we pay for groceries, gas or loan rates, not everyone really understands how it all works.

    Now there is a new online resource available to help explain what those markets mean to everyday life. With easy-to-understand content that everyone from high school students to financial professors will find ­useful, Futures Fundamentals (www.futuresfundamentals.com) makes understanding markets simple.

    The site takes investing concepts like futures, hedging and speculating and shows how they play an essential role in the world around us.

    For example, if you purchased your home with the intent of selling it when the market value exceeded the original price, you likely didn’t think you were speculating. Yet that’s exactly what you were doing. You probably think of having car insurance as common sense, but you’re hedging against risk, just like thousands of companies need to do every day.

    Futures Fundamentals provides a unique educational experience by linking topics in the news to simple explanations, a glossary of terms, and quizzes to sharpen your knowledge. CME Group—one of the world’s leading derivatives exchanges—created Futures Fundamentals with the goal of making financial education an engaging experience for anyone, regardless of how well versed they are in the world of finance.

    “One of the things we’ve seen over the past few years is a real hunger for information about how people and businesses manage risk, and how that risk impacts people’s everyday lives,” said Anita Liskey, CME Group Managing Director, Corporate Marketing & Communications. “Our goal for this site is to be a go-to resource on futures and derivatives, whether you’re a novice on Main Street or an expert on Wall Street.”

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, News | Tagged , , ,

  • Discovery of Plagiarism in Learner Reports

    Discovery of Plagiarism in Learner Reports

    Papers appears to be at the same time fantastic

    Scans like an encyclopedia page

    Speak to librarian for aide: determine crafted and electronic encyclopedias

    Opt for peculiar string of 4-6 phrases or maybe a optimal identity of the report and do an online research

    Posted in News |

  • Felines Take the Stage at SGV

    Blessed Trinity High School "Cats"Students from neighboring Blessed Trinity High School recently performed excerpts from their stage production of Cats, the Musical for the St. George Village community. The talented performers wore their full costumes and treated the audience to an afternoon of fabulous song and dance.

    St. George Village and Blessed Trinity often partner together for community service and friendship! The school has provided passes to SGV residents to all Blessed Trinity events, including football games, concerts, plays and more.

    Thank you, Blessed Trinity!

    Posted in News, Partnerships | Tagged , ,

  • Have More Get-Up-And-Go As Time Goes By

    For optimal health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that older adults get a minimum of two hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or one hour and 15 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity every week. In addition, muscle-strengthening activities should be conducted two or more days a week.

    Exercise can help prevent many physical problems and chronic conditions that come with aging, including weight gain, back pain and heart disease. Plus, it keeps the mind sharp and can help you feel happier, improving symptoms of depression and even dementia. To gain these benefits, however, you need to find a fitness program that provides the physical results desired and is enjoyable, too, so you’ll stick to it.

    Before you begin any exercise program, McMahon has the following tips:

    1. See your doctor, especially if you have a chronic condition.

    2. Start slowly. Begin by walking, say, for 10 minutes or so a day. As you gain energy and your body builds stamina, increase your activity levels and make it more challenging.

    3. Stay motivated. Have realistic short-term goals you can easily meet.

    4. Don’t be intimidated. Remember that everyone had to walk in the door for the first time. Don’t let the thought of starting hold you back. You can do it.

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, News, Wellness |

  • The Season of Giving Thanks

    Full Circle

    The year has turned its circle,
    The seasons come and go.
    The harvest all is gathered in
    And chilly north winds blow.
    Orchards have shared their treasures,
    The fields, their yellow grain,
    So open wide the doorway
    Thanksgiving comes again!
    —Author unknown

    We at St. George Village wish everyone the blessings of health and happiness this Thanksgiving!

     

    Posted in News |

  • Understanding Medicare

    People on Medicare can change plans or enroll in one for the first time by December 7 — or they’ll have to wait until next year.

    During Medicare’s annual open enrollment period, which ends December 7, millions of Medicare beneficiaries must decide on their Medicare Advantage (MA) health plan for the coming year. While many factors go into deciding about a plan—cost, choice of doctors, benefits—there’s one important question Medicare beneficiaries should ask: What is the quality rating of the plans I’m considering?

    A high rating means better health care and the best value for your money. Medicare uses a system called Star Ratings. Plans receive a rating of up to five stars. These ratings are based on things like how well the plan does at keeping people healthy by making sure they get the treatments, tests and vaccines they need to prevent illness, how quickly you can get an appointment and see specialists, and how the plan responds to your complaints and concerns.

    For 2014, over a third of MA plans will receive four or more stars, which is an increase from 28 percent in 2013. Seven of the 11 MA plans earning five stars this year are members of the Alliance of Community Health Plans, an organization representing the nation’s leading health plans.

    You can learn more about MA plans—and their quality ratings—using the Medicare Plan Finder. MA plans are called “Medicare Health Plans” in the Plan Finder.

    The National Committee for Quality Assurance also evaluates quality in MA plans; those rankings can be found at www.ncqa.org.

    — Patricia Smith, president and CEO, Alliance of Community Health Plans.

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, News, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , , , , ,

  • Promoting Improved Quality of Life for Older Georgians

    One of the highlights of the Summit was celebrating a declaration from Gov. Nathan Deal, designating September 26, 2013 as "Culture Change Day in Georgia."

    Fifteen St. George Village care partners and two of the community’s residents attended the 6th Annual Culture Change Summit on Sept. 26. The purpose of the Summit is to bring together interested parties for a discussion of how to effectively change the way people think about seniors and the aging process.

    Keynote speaker and a “Regulator turned Educator” Carmen Bowman spoke to conference attendees about her experience as a nursing home surveyor and discussed how to make senior care communities feel less institutional and more like home for residents.

    St. George Village was well represented, with care partners from Culinary, Dietary, Skilled Nursing (Treasures of Lakeview), Personal Care (The Springs), and Independent Living attending. SGV Social Worker Meredith Swinford participated in a Speakers Panel, where she shared the progress St. George Village has made on its Person-Centered Care journey.

    One of the highlights of the day was celebrating a declaration from Gov. Nathan Deal, designating September 26, 2013 as “Culture Change Day in Georgia.”

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, News, Partnerships, Wellness | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

  • How the Affordable Care Act Affects Your Tax Return

    New health care laws may affect your taxes but do-it-yourself tax programs can help.

    In addition to significant health insurance changes, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 included tax law changes. Several of those changes will impact 2013 federal tax returns, due April 15, 2014.

    “Online tax preparation solutions like TaxACT will cover all the tax implications of the Affordable Care Act plus hundreds of other tax law changes,” said TaxACT spokesperson Jessi Dolmage. “All you have to do is answer simple questions. The program does the math and completes the tax forms for you.”

    The tax law changes in the health care act, also known as “Obamacare,” for 2013 returns include:

    • Reporting health insurance premiums, flexible spending beyond payroll deductions and other premiums paid by employees and their employers. “Simply enter the amount in Box 12 with Code DD on your Form W-2 when prompted by the tax program,” said Dolmage. “You’re providing information only; it won’t change your taxable income.”

    • Higher threshold for deducting medical expenses. The threshold for itemizing medical expenses increases to 10 percent of your adjusted gross income (AGI). The threshold for taxpayers age 65 and older remains at 7.5 percent. Tax software will calculate the deduction based on medical ex­penses entered.

    • 3.8 percent tax on net investment income. Individuals and heads of household with an AGI of $200,000+, married couples filing separately with an AGI of $125,000+, and couples filing jointly with an AGI of $250,000+ must pay the tax. Answer a few questions about investment income and your tax program will do the rest.

    • Additional 0.9 percent Medi­care tax on wages and compensation in excess of $200,000. Taxpayers in those same AGI ranges are subject to the additional Medicare tax. It’s automatically withheld from employee wages, with the total amount provided in Box 6 of Form W-2. The tax is calculated for business owners or self-employed using figures on Schedule SE.

    The health insurance requirement begins to have implications on 2014 income tax returns (due April 2015). If you have health insurance, your online tax solution will guide you through the simple process of reporting it on your tax return. If you don’t have health insurance for a total of three or more months in 2014, you may pay a penalty that’s reported and calculated on your return. Tax programs will calculate the amount based on the number of uninsured individuals in your household and household income.

    Uninsured individuals can shop and apply for health insurance through online “marketplaces,” also called “exchanges,” starting October 1, 2013. States will have their own marketplaces, use the federal government’s Health Insurance Marketplace, or have a hybrid of the two. Enrollment closes March 31, 2014.

    If you don’t have access to minimum required employer-provided insurance and purchase insurance through a marketplace, you may qualify for a tax credit. The money can be used to pay for out-of-pocket expenses such as de­duc­tibles, co-payments and co-insurance. Eligibility and amounts are based on the cost of marketplace premiums and your household size and income. The credit will be paid directly to the health insurance company. If you elect to receive a lesser credit or no credit at all, you can claim the refundable credit on your 2014 tax return.

    Whether you have a simple or complex situation, TaxACT makes it easy to navigate the tax implications of the Affordable Care Act anytime, anywhere. Prepare, print and e-file your federal taxes free at www.taxact.com/afford able-care-act. Visit the Health Insurance Marketplace for information about insurance op­tions.

     

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, News | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

  • Know the Warning Signs of Sun Damage

    Dermatologist Marcus Goodman, M.D., checks SGV resident Agnes Sercer's hand for signs of skin cancer.

    Your skin. It’s your body’s largest organ and a powerful protector — and yet it often goes unappreciated until there’s a problem…like skin cancer.

    Dr. Marcus B. Goodman, a dermatologist who regularly visits St. George Village to provide free skin care checks to residents, believes that prevention, early diagnosis and rapid treatment are the keys to maintaining healthy skin. Dr. Goodman shares the following information.

    What are signs of possible skin cancer?

    Skin cancer occurs when skin cells start growing abnormally, causing cancerous growths. Most skin cancers develop on the visible outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), particularly in sun-exposed areas (face, head, hands, arms and legs). They are usually easy to detect by examining the skin, which increases the chances of early treatment and survival.

    Another effective weapon against skin cancer is regular self-exams. Get to know the landscape of your skin and take an inventory of all moles.

    Because skin cancer can resemble other skin conditions, be sure to tell your doctor about unusual skin changes or lesions, especially:

    • A sore that comes and goes, but never completely heals

    • A shiny bump or nodule, especially if it appears pearly or translucent (these can look brown or reddish and resemble a mole)

    • A slightly raised pink growth with a crusted depression in the center, possibly with tiny blood vessels visible on the surface

    • A patch of skin that is red or irritated, especially on the chest, shoulders or limbs

    • A white or yellowish waxy scar with poorly defined borders

    What precautions should be taken to prevent skin cancer?

    The best protection against skin cancer is to minimize sun exposure, especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. If you do go out in the sun, use a broad-spectrum sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher that protects against UVA and UVB), making sure to cover the head, lips, hands, neck, and ears. Wear a wide-brimmed hat, sun- glasses, and protective clothing. Not only will this dramatically decrease your risk of skin cancer, but it will also prevent other sun-damaging conditions, like wrinkles and actinic keratoses.

    While everyone should minimize their exposure to the sun, fair-skinned people, outdoor workers, and residents of sunny climates should use particular caution. If you have any risk factors, such as prolonged sun exposure, family history, or a past cancerous lesion, you may benefit from having your skin checked regularly by your doctor.

    What are the different types of skin cancer?

    Basal cell carcinoma (also called BCC) comes from the basal cells in lowest part of the epidermis. Approximately 80-85% percent of skin cancers are BCCs.

    Squamous cell carcinoma (also called SCC) comes from the skin cells (keratinocytes) that make up the top layers of the skin. About 10% of
    skin cancers are SCC.

    Melanoma comes from skin cells called melanocytes, which create pigment called melanin that gives skin its color. Five percent of all skin cancers are melanoma. Although less common, it is a very dangerous type of skin cancer and is the leading cause of death from skin disease.

    How is skin cancer treated?

    In general, the treatment plan is based on the risk of the cancer spreading to another location or growing again (recurring) in the same location. Cancers that are likely to spread or recur are treated more aggressively. Treatment options include:

    • Medications

    • Procedures (Cryosurgery, Curettage-electrodessication, Excision and Mohs surgery)

    • Radiation and chemotherapy may be recom-mended in cases when the cancer has spread, or when other medical conditions prevent the use of other treatments.

    Posted in News |