Atlanta Retirement Communities

St. George Village Blog

Category Archive: Independent Living Knowledge Center Lifestyle Partnerships Residents Corner

  • Resident-Staff Collaboration Results in Expanded Menu Options

    Indian Cuisine Chef Education at St. George Village

    When Ken Reheja moved to St. George Village, he knew that the community did not offer his native Indian cuisine. He also knew, however, that as a life plan retirement community, St. George Village has a person centered approach that encourages residents to actively participate and contribute ideas that are part of the community’s continuing evolution. So Ken began offering suggestions to our culinary team, which went to work creating some recipes to incorporate his ideas.

    Recently, Ken approached our Culinary Services Director Daniel Shaffer about the possibility of inviting two of his friends to come to St. George Village to teach a cooking class on Indian cuisine. The class was scheduled and our culinary staff learned how to prepare four authentic recipes, including a soup and an okra dish.

    As a result, our culinary team is committed to a creative process that will lead to more vegetarian offerings on our menus. And we are pleased to offer a diversified cuisine that meets the needs of our residents.

    What a wonderful collaboration between our residents and staff! Thanks, Ken!

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Partnerships, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , , ,

  • God Bless Our Veterans!

    Residents and staff gathered today to honor and remember those who have served in the U.S. Military at a special Veterans Day Ceremony. Each veteran present at the ceremony was recognized with a flag pin, presented by members of the Roswell High School JROTC. Flags were raised by the Roswell High School Color Guard and Rev. Larry Robert of Vitas Hospice led the service. Afterwards, everyone enjoyed a slice of cake and enjoyed sharing stories and visiting with one another.

    Thank you to all veterans! We deeply appreciate your service and sacrifice to preserve our precious freedom!

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, News, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , ,

  • We’re All A-buzz!

    We recently noticed that a colony of honeybees had made their home in one of the stately oak trees near our front entry. We know how important bees are to our environment as pollinators (and makers of delicious honey!), so we called on the services of a local beekeeper to come and help with relocating the bees. Luckily, our UPS delivery driver, Robert Rodden, just happens to be a beekeeper in his spare time and offered to remove the bees from our property and take them home to his own apiary.

    Robert has installed a white super (bee box) on the tree to lure the bees inside — once the queen bee has made her way into the box, the other bees will follow. Then, Robert will temporarily seal the box, remove it from the tree and take the bees home, where they will be installed in a waiting hive.

    Remember, if you ever need to remove honeybees from your property, please don’t call an exterminator! Instead, call your local beekeeping chapter (such as the Metro Atlanta Beekeepers Association) or a bee removal specialist to accomplish this task without harming the bees.

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, News, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , ,

  • What in the Helicopter?!

    On a recent visit to the Tellus Science Museum in Cartersville, Ga., several St. George Village residents and staff enjoyed exploring the various special exhibits and permanent galleries that are housed in the 120,000 square foot world-class museum.

    Pictured here, SGV driver Dave Fagerstrom and resident Jack Dudley admire a Bell Helicopter. The Bell is the first helicopter that Dave flew during his service in Vietnam as an Air Force helicopter pilot.

    The Bell Helicopter is part of Tellus Museum’s Science in Motion Gallery, which explores the relationship mankind has with powered vehicles designed to increase the speed of travel.

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , ,

  • Not for Squares!

    This week, St. George Village members were entertained by a group of square dancing students from Queen of Angels Catholic School. The students curtseyed and bowed, allemanded, circled, do si doed, passed through, and swung their partners, showing how much fun square dancing can be!

    Besides fun, did you know that square dancing offers other physical, mental and social benefits? Square dancing can help keep you fit by burning calories, lowering blood pressure, improving cholesterol, strengthening weight-bearing bones and slowing bone loss, and more. This form of dance also keeps you on your mental toes by requiring you to react to the “calls” for changing movements and steps. Plus, square dancing requires teamwork, with each team of eight dancers depending on each other to keep the dance moving.

    Thanks, Queen of Angels students, for showing us how much fun square dancing can be!

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Partnerships | Tagged , , , ,

  • Brain Health: How You Can Make A Difference

    If you put your mind to it, you can make smart choices that will support brain health as you age.

    If you’re like most people, you’ve noticed differences in the way your mind works over time. The good news is that understanding the potential threats to brain health can help you make smart choices to strengthen mental alertness.

    Some health conditions can negatively affect your brain. Heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes can alter or damage blood vessels throughout your body, including the brain.

    Some medications and combinations of drugs, as well as alcohol use, may affect thinking.
    Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia harm the brain, too. While no one knows how to prevent dementia, many approaches that are good for your health in other ways, like exercise and a healthy diet, are being tested.

    Actions That Help Your Brain:

    • Get regular health screenings.

    • Manage diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

    • Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about the medications you take and any possible side effects.

    • Try to maintain a balanced diet of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats (including fish and poultry), and low-fat or nonfat dairy products. Monitor your intake of solid fat, sugar and salt and eat proper portion sizes.

    • Drink moderately, if at all, because avoiding alcohol can reverse some negative changes related to brain health.

    • Be physically active be cause doing so may improve connections among your brain cells. Older adults should get at least 150 minutes of exercise each week.

    • Don’t smoke. Quitting at any age will be beneficial to your mind and body. Nonsmokers have a lower risk of heart attacks, stroke and lung diseases, as well as increased blood circulation.

    • Be safe. Older adults are at higher risk of falling and other accidents that can cause brain injury. To reduce your risk, exercise to improve balance and coordination, take a falls prevention class and make your home safer.

    • Keep your mind active by doing mentally stimulating activities including reading, playing games, teaching or taking a class, and being social. Volunteer.

    • Visit an Area Agency on Aging (AAA). These community-based agencies provide a welcoming environment for older adults and caregivers interested in learning about services from meals, transportation and in-home care to volunteer opportunities and classes to keep them healthy and engaged.

    For more information and a free brochure containing strategies to promote brain health, call the Eldercare Locator at 800-677-1116 or visit www.eldercare.gov.

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Residents Corner, Wellness | Tagged , , , ,

  • Aging “SMART”

    Staying sharp mentally can help you maintain your independence.

    In a recent survey by the Global Social Enterprise Initiative at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business and Philips, 96 percent of senior respondents said it’s important to be as independent as possible as they get older. For seniors to maintain that independence, it pays to age “SMART.” By combining basic physical and mental wellness techniques with technology, seniors can continue living the full, active lives they want and deserve. Consider these ideas:

    S—Stay active, eat healthy: Activities such as walking and light weight lifting can help with balance and agility, preserving mobility and making you less likely to fall. Group classes de­signed for seniors can be a great way to stay fit and socialize.

    Eat lots of fruits and veggies, lean proteins and smart carbohydrates. High blood pressure can be of particular concern with age, so diets should be low in sodium.

    M—Mental fitness: Your brain needs a workout, too. Studies have associated activities such as reading, playing a musical instrument, learning a new language, playing memory games and other cognitively stimulating exercises with a slower rate of mental decline. Staying sharp mentally can help you maintain your independence by empowering you to manage everyday tasks.

    A—A good night’s sleep: Lack of sleep can impair your memory, slow reaction time and exacerbate other conditions. Keeping a regular schedule, avoiding caffeine and sleeping in a dark, relaxing environment can help.

    R—Remembering medications: It can be tricky to keep track of your medications but getting doses and timing right are crucial to maintaining your independence. One in 10 senior hospitalizations is related to medication mismanagement. The good news is there are lots of tools out there to help, some as simple as plastic pill-organizing boxes. More advanced solutions include mobile apps that send you a reminder when it’s time for meds and automatic devices that dispense pre-sorted medications at preprogrammed times.

    T—Technology to keep connected: E-mail, Facebook and Skype can be great ways to stay connected with family and friends. You can watch your grandkid’s soccer game from halfway across the country or catch up with a friend you haven’t seen in decades. Isolation and loneliness can take a huge toll on mental health, so it’s important to maintain and create relationships.

    Technology also keeps seniors connected to help and lets them go about busy, active lives with less worry. Mobile response apps can connect seniors to a call center with the simple click of a button in the case of an emergency. Medical alert services provide seniors with direct access to a response associate both in their homes and on the go. Some even come equipped with fall detection technology that can signal for help if a fall is detected, when the senior is unable to do so.

    For more resources related to aging “SMART,” visit Philips Lifeline.

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle | Tagged , , , , ,

  • The Healthy Benefits of Pet Ownership

    SGV resident Pat Smith says it just wouldn’t feel like home without her faithful companion, Mia.

    Evidence suggests that four-legged friends provide a number of health benefits for older adults, according to Pet Partners, a nonprofit organization that promotes positive human-animal interactions to improve the physical, emotional and psychological lives of both. A number of studies have shown that seniors who own pets actually go to the doctor less with minor health issues.

    Additionally, research has shown that interacting with animals can help people decrease their cholesterol levels, fight depression and may even help protect against heart disease and stroke. And, the companionship that pets provide motivates older adults to be more involved in daily activities and encourages socializing.

    At St. George Village, we understand the importance of the bond between people and their four-legged family members and, as a pet-friendly lifecare community, are pleased to welcome them!

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Residents Corner | Tagged , ,

  • Spend The Longest Day Honoring Those Facing Alzheimer’s

    On June 21, 2014, participants in The Longest Day will raise funds to fuel the care, support and research programs of the Alzheimer’s Association

    Across the U.S., more than 5 million people are living with Alzheimer’s disease every day and more than 15 million Americans are their caregivers. On June 21st, the longest day of the year, everyone can show those facing Alzheimer’s that they are not alone.

    The Longest Day is a sunrise-to-sunset challenge to raise funds and awareness to fuel the care, support and research programs of the Alzheimer’s Association.

    The event challenges people to choose an activity they love—running, knitting, cooking—and complete 16 hours of it as a team. For example, last year more than 160 American Contract Bridge League clubs participated in the event and raised more than $575,000.

    The Alzheimer’s Association is calling on people around the world to honor the strength, passion and endurance of those facing Alz­heimer’s by getting involved in The Longest Day. Participants in The Longest Day are part of a movement to raise funds and awareness for the cause during Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month in June—an opportunity to hold a global conversation about the brain, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

    Alzheimer’s disease is a growing epidemic and is the nation’s sixth leading cause of death. It is the only cause of death among the top 10 without a way to prevent, cure or even slow its progression. On June 21st, participants of The Longest Day complete a day filled with activity to honor those living with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers.

    The Alzheimer’s Association is the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Its mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the ad­vancement of research, to provide and enhance care and support for all affected, and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.

    The Association provides care and support across the country through a free 24/7 Helpline and website, educational sessions and support groups. The organization also advocates for people facing Alzheimer’s, helping to pass landmark legislation such as the National Alzheimer’s Project Act. As the largest nonprofit funder of Alzheimer’s research, the Association has been part of every major research advancement over the past 30 years.

    To learn more, visit The Longest Day or on the Association’s Facebook page.

    Posted in Knowledge Center, News, Partnerships | Tagged , , ,

  • A Life Care Community Offers Many Benefits

    It began with the sound advice of family members, says Jean Moll of her and her husband Don’s decision to move into a life care community.

    “Two of my cousins were living in continuous care retirement communities and both loved their lifestyle. We talked about it at length and they gave me their honest viewpoint,” she recalls. “They told us it was a very good deal, financially, too.”

    The Molls next sought the advice of their investment advisor. “We wanted to be sure we could afford to make the move into a life care community,” Jean says. “Our advisor helped us sort out our financial picture and see that it was a sound investment.”

    The Molls decided that living at St. George Village would be a wise decision, both for the present and the future, and they moved into the community in December 2005. Soon, the benefits of residing in a life care community became apparent, when Don moved into the memory care neighborhood and later skilled nursing.

    Although Don recently passed away, Jean still resides independently at SGV. She takes advantage of the many benefits that a vibrant life care community has to offer, including attending church services, exercise classes and educational and cultural events, as well as the excellent meals provided by dining services. “I love not having to cook!” she laughs.

    Jean says she is grateful not only for the care that Don received as his health needs changed, but also for the assurance that the same level of care will be available to her if and when she needs it.

    “Our investment has assured I’ll be taken care of, no matter what my needs are in the future,” she says.

    Posted in Independent Living, Knowledge Center, Lifestyle, Residents Corner | Tagged , , , , ,